India’s Street Scene isn’t all Saris & Turbans

November 06, 2019

India’s Street Scene isn’t all Saris & Turbans

India’s streets are a constantly changing spectacle of color, movement and drama, a photographer’s dream. Doesn’t matter whether you shoot with your smartphone or the most sophisticated camera, the results will be thrilling images suffused with personality.

And what you see on the streets can be a surprisingly modern fashion scene. India isn’t all saris and turbans. The people of India have an uncanny knack for mixing color and pattern, the avant-garde with the traditional, to create a vibrantly alive form of self expression.

New York fashion blogger Scott Schuman captures that joie de vivre in a new book, ”The Satorialist: India.  His candid portraits range from a young woman with a marigold-yellow bob to a mustachioed, middle-aged street vendor with the air of a bon vivant. These are not people of means—many certainly qualify as poor. Nonetheless, they have innate style.

Image from "The Sartorialist: India"

Schuman, a.k.a. The Sartorialist, has been chasing the beauty in India’s markets, music festivals, city streets and cricket fields for more than a decade. He combines the sensibilities of a photojournalist with the eye of a fashionista as he ranges through India’s major cities but also many of its rural villages.

He is well-known in the fashion industry, shooting campaigns for Gap, Verizon, Nespresso, DKNY Jeans, Absolut, and Burberry. His work has been collected by the Victoria & Albert Museum in London and Tokyo’s Metropolitan Museum of Photography. In this, his fourth book, Schuman partnered with writer Bandana Tewari, editor at large for Vogue India.

"I have the eyes of a costume designer," he told CNN Style reporter Somak Ghoshai. "I want to show what clothes can tell us about the person wearing them.”

When he’s in India, Schuman attends fashion shows, sure. But he makes his most interesting portraits while driving through the countryside or wandering aimlessly in the streets.

Image from "The Sartoralist: India"

“In India, people on the street are more open to being photographed than in Western cities. (Most people seemed) happy about being seen and recognized," Schuman told CNN, adding that, regardless of income, Indians make “informed personal decisions” about their clothing. His portraits defy the stereotype that “you cannot have a sense of style if you don't have money."

Image from "The Sartorialist: India"

By Susan Caba

Director of Development

Mehera Shaw I Mehera Shaw Textiles Pvt. Ltd

 

“The Satorialist: India,” (Taschen)

#India #Travel #IndiaFashion #TheSartorialist #ScottSchuman




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We use a fit guide for each of our styles to provide more information about the fit that was intended.

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All garments have been washed several times during the printing/dyeing and manufacturing process.  

CARE for 100% cotton

We recommend cold water machine wash (up to 30 degrees celsius) with a bio detergent and either tumble dry on low heat or line dry in shade for all of our 100% cotton garments/homewares (except for quilts).  

Iron on reverse side of garment following fabric settings.  

Do not use bleach or stain remover.

Cold water wash and low heat drying or line drying in the shade will increase the life of the garment, prolong the vibrancy of the colors and reduce energy use. Shrinkage on all cottons is minimal, approximately 3%.

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Please keep in mind that indigo dye does continually fade over time.  This is the nature of true indigo dye and is not a defect, but rather a sign of the 'living' nature of the dye.

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Iron on reverse side of garment following fabric settings.

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Dry cleaning using an eco-friendly service is also recommended.

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Tumble dry on low heat or line dry in shade.  

Iron on reverse side of garment following fabric settings.

Do not use bleach or stain remover.