Fashionista stars who go beyond “pretty,” to focus on fair labor practices and sustainability

March 03, 2019

Fashionista stars who go beyond “pretty,”  to focus on fair labor practices and sustainability

 

 

Almost everyone is jumping on the “conscious fashion” bandwagon these days—even a few charlatans! But there are some who put their principles into practice before it was (ahem) fashionable. These leaders demonstrated early on their commitment to the concepts of “ethical,” “sustainable” and “fair.”

 

    • Eileen Fisher is at the top of our list. The designer uses organic fabrics, natural dyes and recycled materials in garments. But her support goes beyond merely placing orders. Her company works closely with artisans and artisan-based companies to develop their businesses, helping them achieve continual progress toward sustainability goals. Eileen Fisher is a trusted partner helping her vendors succeed according to a transparent, long-range plan called Vision2020.

 

    • Designer Stella McCartney, a lifelong vegetarian and environmentalist, is sometimes called “the Queen of Sustainability,” for her nearly two-decade commitment to environmental standards, notably her aversion to fur and leather. The Good on You app notes that McCartney’s firm could use improvement in its transparency, and willingness to guarantee workers are paid a living wage but, overall, gives the label a “good” rating. Despite the need for improvement (and aren’t we all trying to be better?), McCartney deserves praise for using her own celebrity—hashtag #itsnotjustStella—to bring attention to other, less well-known brands producing ethical fashion.

 

    • Actor and activist Emma Watson (you first knew her as Hermione in the Harry Potter movies) has been promoting fair trade practices since at least 2010, when she launched a website dedicated to sustainable fashion, and helped create three collections of organic and fair trade clothing. Last year, she guest edited an issue of Australia Vogue and dedicated the issue to changing consumer thinking and behavior. Change, she notes, can be intimidating. “I want to propose something to you,” she wrote. “When steering a boat, a captain can shift the wheel one degree and it drastically changes the course of the boat. I would like to challenge you, after reading this issue, to make a one-degree shift, because a small change can make a huge difference.” We’re definitely on board with that!

--

Susan Caba

Director of Development

Mehera Shaw Textiles, LLC




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Fit/Sizing/Care

FIT

Our styles are meant to give room to breath and move.  We use fine tailoring coupled with a relaxed, comfortable fit.

We use a fit guide for each of our styles to provide more information about the fit that was intended.

Slim Fit: a close fit to the body. Regular Fit: a comfortable, relaxed fit with room around the body. Generous Fit: a very loose fit (such as in our oversized blouses) with lots of room around the body for ease of movement.

SIZING

h4XS/ 36

h4S/ 38

h4M/40

h4L/ 42

h4XL/44

h4chest

h435.5 inches/ 90 cm

h437.5 inches/95 cm

h439.5 inches/ 100 cm

h441.5 inches/ 105 cm

h444.5 inches. 113 cm

h44cm extra from body

h4waist

h426 inches/ 66 cm

h428 inches/ 71 cm

h430 inches/ 76 cm

h432 inches/ 81 cm

h435 inches/ 89 cm

h4fitted

h4low waist

h428 inches/71 cm

h430 inches/76 cm

h432 inches/ 81 cm

h434 inches/ 86 cm

h437 inches/ 94 cm

h4fitted

h4hip

h437 inches/ 94 cm

h439 inches/ 99 cm

h441 inches/ 104 cm

h443 inches/ 109 cm

h446 inches/ 1

h44cm extra from body

WASHCARE

All garments have been washed several times during the printing/dyeing and manufacturing process.  

CARE for 100% cotton

We recommend cold water machine wash (up to 30 degrees celsius) with a bio detergent and either tumble dry on low heat or line dry in shade for all of our 100% cotton garments/homewares (except for quilts).  

Iron on reverse side of garment following fabric settings.  

Do not use bleach or stain remover.

Cold water wash and low heat drying or line drying in the shade will increase the life of the garment, prolong the vibrancy of the colors and reduce energy use. Shrinkage on all cottons is minimal, approximately 3%.

Garments/homewares are dyed or printed using AZO free, low-impact, pigment or reactive dyes unless otherwise noted.  These dyes are color-fast, but care should still be taken to wash with like colors to retain the vibrancy of the colors.

CARE for 100% cotton quilts

For quilts with cotton fill, we recommend spot or light surface cleaning only with a damp cloth and mild detergent.  Eco-friendly dry cleaning is also recommended. 

CARE for herbal/vegetable dye items

Vegetable dyes are not colorfast and are specifically marked in the product description.  We strongly recommend that all vegetable dye products be washed once before use in a cold water wash with minimal detergent.  Wash separately. Tumble dry on low heat or line dry in shade.  Iron on reverse side.  Do not use bleach or stain remover.

Please keep in mind that indigo dye does continually fade over time.  This is the nature of true indigo dye and is not a defect, but rather a sign of the 'living' nature of the dye.

CARE for silk and cotton/silk

For our silk and cotton silk garments/homewares, we also recommend gentle cycle machine wash cold water (up to 30 degrees celsius) or delicate hand washing to increase the life of the garment and reduce the environmental footprint from energy use, detergents and water wastage.  

Tumble dry on low heat or line dry in shade.  

Iron on reverse side of garment following fabric settings.

Do not use bleach or stain remover.

Dry cleaning using an eco-friendly service is also recommended.

CARE for linen and cotton/linen

For our linen and cotton linen garments/homewares, we also recommend gentle cycle machine wash cold water (up to 30 degrees celsius) or delicate hand washing to increase the life of the garment and reduce the environmental footprint from energy use, detergents and water wastage.  

Tumble dry on low heat or line dry in shade.  

Iron on reverse side of garment following fabric settings.

Do not use bleach or stain remover.

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